Tsunami can be defined as a sequence of ocean waves of bizarrely enormous length that are engendered by incessant uproars of the earth’s outer layer. This sticking force causes mass destruction of property and human beings. There is also a widespread epicenter under or near the ocean, and with a vertical displacement of the ocean floor; these strong waves have numerous effects to Human beings (Danninger and Kang 75).

Loss of Life

Many lives of people along Japan coastal regions have been lost because population along coastal regions has been growing tremendously. This historically can be traced in parts of Japan coastal region which is closely populated according to a research, it is estimated that over 1,000 people lost their life after 1960 tsunami in Japan.

The force of tsunami wave may kill people instantly, or they may drown people when water rushes to land, the electrical installation also contributed to this loss since there was a possibility of people being electrocuted if wires are exposed. Many people were affected psychologically in most of coastal regions, due to this loss. 1,000 houses were destroyed in September 1498, resulting to around 500 deaths following a tsunami that hit the Kii peninsula.

In September 1596, there was another destructive tsunami in Kyushu (OECD 56). These findings show severe effects of tsunami to human beings who have been affected. Most of coastal regions’ vulnerable women, men and their children lost their lives while carrying on with their daily chores.

Destruction and Damage

Many people’s property was lost since many businesses are set along the coastal lines during this devastating time. People lost their daily income due to the destruction. Coastal regions took long to stabilize because of this effect. Tsunami effects were reported in the media across the world.

However, these effects continue for many years after the natural disaster struck Japan. Many people affected, will never forget this terrifying experience of being caught in a tsunami they live to tell shocking of their lives moments. Tsunami tide waves on the sore can destroy anything on the path these includes. Boats buildings, hotels, cars trees telephone lines (Danninger and Kang 90).

New Diseases Emerged

The stagnant water displaced by tsunami waves in flooded areas also caused illness such as malaria from stagnated water and contamination. This caused more deaths and sickness in the affected areas. The tampering with infrastructure like sewerage and fresh water supplies worsened the situation. Lack of fresh water led to the outbreak of diseases like cholera and other related diseases due to this situation.

Victims Suffer Psychology Problems

This could continue for a while or often their entire life time According to the study done by WHO on survival of tsunami victims recorded stress, disorders to children, anxious among other effects that were noticed in the area. Loss of homes also resulted to depression.

High Cost of Fighting Tsunami

The total cost of tsunami could be billions of dollars since the damages of income generating business, and the cost used to curb the situation on the ground was quite high. Japan government issued newer bounds for rebuilding and reconstruction. The country spent most of the finances on the victims.

The better part was that Japan has a substantial income. This made it easier for it to rekindle finances lost, since it has excellent infrastructure and quality health conditions on top of a huge economy. The greatest loss was demographic challenges and existing fiscal burden.

Export and Import Alteration

Since Japan is an industrialist state, it was affected in terms of exports and imports. Many of the manufactured products in Japan could still stay in ports since transporting them during tsunami was risky. Therefore, manufactured products like Honda Toyota, Sony added up to the financial burden consequently affecting the economy (OECD 43).

Closing down Japanese prime oil refineries due to the calamity decreased demand for oil and lowered the cost of crude oil prices. In addition, Japan is an industrialized country; shortage of electricity jeopardized the operations in this sector. This was attributed to slowdown due to the shortage of electricity generating capacity.

The risk of nuclear reactors when tsunami hit Japan

Nuclear reactors in Japans’ tsunami and earthquakes have hampered efforts to get it restored. Some nuclear reactors lost their cooling ability during the tsunami prompting a rush against time to fix the problem. These media reports showed that Tsunami had a role to play in these reactors.

The Japanese government treatment with the tsunami

Before the Tsunami

Japanese government ability to deal with crisis is beyond doubt. The fact that Japan is a developed country, it was in a position to respond to Tsunami swiftly. Despite its impact on the economy, Japan government had set its military base in order to respond to this situation (Dick and Nanto 27). This unique military base is capable of dealing with any situation of which they had set right materials and equipments and manpower to curb Tsunami.

This prompted this military base to keep on practicing and equipping its self from any calamity this readiness by the government was able to respond to the crisis swiftly and saved thousands of people. Special techniques’ and right equipments used by the government placed the government in a particularly strategic place. This acquainted the soldiers with confidence and also the residents.

A government’s unique unit was of significant help to residents since it taught victims on how to respond to such calamities. Japan metrological department warned people of Tsunami and asked people to be cautions of it, by possibly vacating the area. The department used satellite and kept on monitoring the ground and alerted people on the television of its whereabouts.

However, this information come about late and people could no act swiftly to the onset of the Tsunami since it was quite fast. This left many people being confused on the way. Signs, alarms and media warnings were a little bit late since the population was high along this region (Danninger and Kang 143). Unfortunately, many did not make it out of danger.

After the Tsunami Happened

Japan has tried to prevent Tsunami effects by building concrete breakwaters and floodgates to protect coastal areas around the country. This will prevent strong currents that come with force. However, it has warned that it cannot prevent Tsunami. Government has also set personnel to encourage the victims and depressed people to cope with the situation this has given the victims motivation to continue to survive (Dick and Nanto 46).

They have also set laws related to this destruction. These will be able to budget for the calamity when it occurs so as to avoid it hurting the economy. These guidelines have seen Japanese people build confidence in investing in coastal regions which were considered risky by many local and foreign investors.

This development has seen the Japanese recover from previous loses that arouse from the Tsunami. Development of technology has also boosted swift measures on ocean areas. This has been done by setting new devices and machines which will help Japan to cope with Tsunami in future (OECD 32).

Conclusion

In conclusion, Tsunami can be defined as a sequence of ocean waves of bizarrely enormous length that are engendered by incessant uproars of the earth’s outer layer. This sticking force causes mass destruction of property and human beings. In Japan, Many people affected will never forget this terrifying experience of being caught in a tsunami they live to tell shocking of their lives moments.

In an effort to prepare for such a disaster, Japan has tried to prevent Tsunami effects by building concrete breakwaters and floodgates to protect coastal areas around the country. This will prevent strong currents that come with force.

Works cited

Danninger, Stephan and Kenneth Kang. Finance & Development. Washington: International Monetary Fund, 2011. Print.

Dick K. Nanto. Japanzs 2011 Earthquake and Tsunami: Economic Effects and Implications for the United States. New York: DIANE Publishing, 2011. Print.

OECD. OECD Economic Outlook, Volume 2011, Issue 1. Paris: OECD Publishing, 2011. Print.